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Live coverage as cardinals select new pope

  • Ungodly queues for cardinals 10am pre-conclave mass at San Pietro.
  • March of the Cardinals into San Pietro mass before conclave start. One will be pope this week. http://pbs.twimg.com/media/BFJTNQtCQAA2T4G.jpg

  • Love the cardinals' hats, each looking rather pope-like already. http://pbs.twimg.com/media/BFJUA5hCcAAIx2a.jpg

  • From this San Pietro balcony, a cardinal will this week say Habemus Papum. http://pbs.twimg.com/media/BFJWm2MCUAAyS8C.jpg

  • From the Associated Press, here's the full text of the oath sworn by cardinals prior to voting for the new pope:

    “We, the Cardinal electors present in this election of the Supreme Pontiff promise, pledge and swear, as individuals and as a group, to observe faithfully and scrupulously the prescriptions contained in the Apostolic Constitution of the Supreme Pontiff John Paul II, Universi Dominici Gregis, published on 22 February 1996.
    We likewise promise, pledge and swear that whichever of us by divine disposition is elected Roman Pontiff will commit himself faithfully to carrying out the munus Petrinum of Pastor of the Universal Church and will not fail to affirm and defend strenuously the spiritual and temporal rights and the liberty of the Holy See.

    In a particular way, we promise and swear to observe with the greatest fidelity and with all persons, clerical or lay, secrecy regarding everything that in any way relates to the election of the Roman Pontiff and regarding what occurs in the place of the election, directly or indirectly related to the results of the voting; we promise and swear not to break this secret in any way, either during or after the election of the new Pontiff, unless explicit authorization is granted by the same Pontiff; and never to lend support or favour to any interference, opposition or any other form of intervention, whereby secular authorities of whatever order and degree or any group of people or individuals might wish to intervene in the election of the Roman Pontiff.“

    Click here to read more about the oath.
  • We all think the elector cardinals are old men, but there is a huge age range. Oldest born in 1933, youngest in 1959.
  • Cardinals attends a mass in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican (Stefano Rellandini/Reuters)

  • Visitors watch a mass at St. Peter's Basilica shown on a video monitor in Vatican Square attended by cardinals before sequestering themselves in the Sistine Chapel for the conclave to elect the next pope at the Vatican, Tuesday, March 12, 2013 (Michael Sohn/The Associated Press)

  • Cardinals attend a mass in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican (Stefano Rellandini/Reuters)

  • Independent reporting that Holy See has purchased a Rome property that houses Europe's biggest gay sauna. How do you say oops in Latin?
  • Cardinal Angelo Sodano leads mass in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican March 12, 2013. (Stefano Rellandini/Reuters)

  • Here's Eric's latest file from the Vatican on the cardinals' final Mass before entering the conclave.
  • To give credit where credit is due, the story re Vatican buying building with gay sauna was broken by Italy's La Repubblica yesterday.
  • http://Oddschecker.com has Canadian Cardinal Marc Ouellet holding at 5th spot in pope race, whose first ballot begins in a few hours.
  • Vatican press office feels like old-fashioned newsroom, hacks packed in. One Italian hack proof-reading his copy by reading aloud. Love it!
  • For more images from the Vatican as cardinals begin the process of electing a new pope, click here: www.theglobeandmail.com
  • A Swiss Guard is seen during a mass in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican (Stefano Rellandini/Reuters)

  • A Cardinal prays during a mass in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican (Stefano Rellandini/Reuters)

  • A cross is seen on a Cardinal cassock during a mass in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican (Stefano Rellandini/Reuters)

  • Here's some information, from Reuters, on the who, what, where and how of electing a new pope:

    WHO - 115 cardinals who were aged under 80 when Benedict abdicated are participating. Two other eligible cardinals are not attending - one for health reasons, one because of his involvement in a sex scandal. Ninety cardinals aged 80 or over cannot take part. The person chosen as pope does not have to be one of the cardinal electors, but in practice now always is.

    The elector cardinals come from 48 countries. Italians make up the biggest single national bloc, with 28 cardinals against 11 from the United States, six from Germany and five each from India and Brazil. Sixty cardinals come from Europe, 19 from Latin America, 14 from North America, 11 from Africa, 10 from Asia and one from Oceania.

    WHERE - The cardinals start their meeting at 4:30 p.m. in the Sistine Chapel, under Michelangelo’s frescoes of the Last Judgment and of Bible scenes including the creation panel with the finger of God and the finger of Adam nearly touching. Cardinals sleep in a Vatican hotel behind St Peter’s Basilica. They will be banned from communicating with the outside world - no phones, television or Internet.

    HISTORY - The word conclave (from Latin “cum clave”, or “with a key”) dates back to the protracted election of Celestine IV in 1241, when cardinals were locked up in a crumbling palace. One conclave in the 13th century lasted two years, nine months and two days. The average length of the past nine conclaves was just over three days. The last conclave, which elected Benedict in 2005, lasted barely 24 hours.

    BALLOTING - The cardinals will almost certainly cast their first vote on Tuesday. From Wednesday they will vote twice each morning and twice each afternoon. The cardinals will suspend voting on Saturday if they have not chosen a pontiff and resume their balloting on Sunday. To win, a candidate needs a two-thirds majority, or at least 77 votes.

    SMOKE - After cardinals cast their votes on papers printed with the Latin words “Eligo in Summum Pontificem” (”I choose as Supreme Pkeithntiff”), the ballots are burned and smoke pours from a makeshift chimney above the Sistine Chapel.

    The smoke signals, telling the world whether or not cardinals have elected a new pope, are expected at around noon and 7 p.m. each voting day. However, smoke could emerge earlier if the new pontiff is elected in the first ballot of one of the sessions.

    Black smoke marks an inconclusive vote; white smoke and the tolling of the bells of St. Peter’s Basilica mean a pope has been elected.

    “HABEMUS PAPAM” - When a pope is chosen, a senior cardinal appears on the balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica and announces in Latin: “Annuntio vobis gaudium magnum. Habemus Papam” (”I announce to you great joy. We have a pope”). He identifies the new pope by his given name, with his first name translated into its Latin version, and then announces the papal name the new leader of the Church has chosen.

    The papal names most often chosen have been John (23 times), Gregory (16), Benedict (16), Clement (14), Innocent (13), Leo (13) and Pius (12).

    After the announcement, the new pope steps forward to deliver his first public address and his first “Urbi et Orbi” (”To the City and the World”) blessing in front of the crowds gathered in St. Peter’s Square.
  • Hello everyone. I'm Jill Mahoney, a reporter here at The Globe. I'll be helping with our live coverage today.
  • Here is a schedule of today's events, via Reuters:

    12 noon (7 a.m. EDT) - After celebrating Mass at St. Peter's Basilica, the cardinals return to the hotel, where they can still have contact with the outside world because the conclave has not yet begun.

    3:45 p.m. (10:45 a.m. EDT) - The cardinal electors leave the hotel and head to the Vatican’s Apostolic Palace, where they gather for prayer in the Pauline Chapel.

    4:30 p.m. (11:30 a.m. EDT) - The cardinal electors move in a procession, while singing and praying, from the Pauline Chapel to the Sistine Chapel.

    4:45 p.m. (11:45 a.m. EDT) - All those not having anything to do with the conclave leave the Sistine Chapel when the master of ceremonies intones “Extra Omnes” (all out) and the great doors of the frescoed chapel are shut.

    The conclave officially starts.

    5:00 p.m. (1 p.m. EDT) - After prayers, the cardinals may decide to hold a first vote.

    7 p.m. - 8 p.m. (2-3 p.m. EDT) - If they have voted, the ballots are burned in one stove and flares are burned in an electronic stove to produce the correct colour. The flues of the two stoves converge into one that emerges from the roof of the Sistine Chapel. White smoke means a pope has been elected and black smoke means the vote is inconclusive.

    If the cardinals take a first vote on Tuesday, it is expected to be inconclusive because there is no frontrunner, meaning black smoke will emerge.

    7:30 p.m. (2:30 p.m. EDT) - If no pope has been elected, the cardinals return to their residence.

    8:00 p.m. (3 p.m. EDT) - The cardinals dine together in the residence.

    From Wednesday, the cardinals will vote as many as four times a day, twice in the morning and twice in the afternoon, until they have elected a new leader of the Roman Catholic Church.

    If no one has been elected by Friday, the cardinals will hold a day of prayer and reflection on Saturday before resuming the voting.
  • Here is some colour on the scene in Rome from The Associated Press as the cardinals prepare to select a new pope:

    A group of women who say they are priests launched pink smoke from a balcony overlooking the square during the Mass to demand female ordination — a play on the famous smoke signals that will tell the world whether a pope has been elected. The Femen group of women activists, several of whom have gone topless in St. Peter’s to protest the Vatican’s opposition to gay marriage, were also due to protest Tuesday.

    And in a bizarre twist, basketball star Dennis Rodman is expected to arrive in St. Peter’s Square on Wednesday in a makeshift popemobile as he campaigns for Cardinal Peter Turkson of Ghana to become the church’s first black pope.
  • Wondering just how the cardinals cast their votes? Here are more details from The Associated Press:

    Each cardinal writes his choice on a paper inscribed with the words “Eligo in summen pontificem,” or “I elect as Supreme Pontiff.” They approach the altar one by one and say: “I call as my witness, Christ the Lord who will be my judge, that my vote is given to the one who, before God, I think should be elected.”

    The folded ballot is placed on a round plate and slid into an oval silver and gold urn. In the past, a single chalice was used to hold the ballots. But conclave changes made by Pope John Paul II in 1996 required three vessels: one for chapel ballots, another for ailing cardinals at the Vatican who can vote from their beds and the third to hold the ballots after counting. No cardinals are expected to require the bedside voting, but all three flying saucer-shaped urns were in the Sistine Chapel regardless.

    The ballots are then bound together with a needle and thread — each pierced through the word “Eligo” — and burned in the chapel stove along with a chemical to produce either black or white smoke.
  • Different sizes of papal vestments hang ready for use at the Sistine Chapel in advance of the conclave at the Vatican on March 12, 2013. Tailors delivered three different sizes of white vestments – small, medium and large – confident that whoever becomes pope will be able to find a garment to fit him before stepping out onto the balcony. Seven different shoe sizes were also readied, along with a distinctive red cape. REUTERS/Osservatore Romano

  • Click here to read Eric's latest file from the Vatican. An excerpt:

    Having never covered a papal conclave before, being a somewhat lapsed Catholic and pretty much a full-time business and economics writer, I feel perfectly qualified to call the next pope: Cardinal Odilo Scherer of Brazil.
  • Canadian Cardinal Marc Ouellet attends a mass in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican on March 12, 2013. REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini

  • Faithful hold their umbrellas as they follow a mass inside St. Peter's Basilica celebrated by Cardinal Angelo Sodano, seen on a giant screen in St. Peter's Square on March 12, 2013. AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti

  • Eric Reguly: My bet for pope? Cardinal Odilo Scherer. Here’s why http://tgam.ca/DoK9 via @globeandmail iPhone app
  • Cardinals filing in for mass before start of conclave. One will be pope by Friday. http://vine.co/v/bwLEWeF9jKA
  • Click here to read Eric's piece on the steps the Vatican is taking to ensure there are no voting leaks. Here's an excerpt:

    The Vatican appears to be taking cues from MI5 and other spy agencies to keep the voting of the papal conclave ultra-secret. The goal is to prevent a repeat of the 2005 conclave, when a German cardinal leaked the identity of the winner – Joseph Ratzinger, who would become Pope Benedict XVI minutes later – to a German TV network before his name was officially announced.
  • Cardinals celebrate final Mass before entering conclave to elect new pope http://tgam.ca/DoKS via @globeandmail iPhone app
  • Here's more on candidates considered as possible favourites to be the next pope, from Reuters:

    Italy’s Angelo Scola and Brazil’s Odilo Scherer are spoken of as possible frontrunners. The former would return the papacy to Italy after 35 years in the hands of Poland’s John Paul II and the German Benedict; the latter would be the first non-European pope since Syrian-born Gregory III in the 8th century.

    However, a host of other candidates from numerous nations have also been mentioned as “papabili” - potential popes - including U.S. cardinals Timothy Dolan and Sean O’Malley, Canada’s Marc Ouellet and Argentina’s Leonardo Sandri.
  • Faithful gather in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican on March 12, 2013. Cardinals heard a final appeal for unity Tuesday before sequestering themselves in the Sistine Chapel for the conclave to elect the next pope. AP Photo/Luca Bruno

  • The conclave is expected to officially begin in less than half an hour.

    Here's the timeline for today's upcoming events: (All times local + Eastern)

    4:30 p.m. (11:30 a.m. EDT) - The cardinal electors move in a procession, while singing and praying, from the Pauline Chapel to the Sistine Chapel.

    4:45 p.m. (11:45 a.m. EDT) - All those not having anything to do with the conclave leave the Sistine Chapel when the master of ceremonies intones “Extra Omnes” (all out) and the great doors of the frescoed chapel are shut.

    The conclave officially starts.

    5:00 p.m. (1 p.m. EDT) - After prayers, the cardinals may decide to hold a first vote.

    7 p.m. - 8 p.m. (2-3 p.m. EDT) - If they have voted, the ballots are burned in one stove and flares are burned in an electronic stove to produce the correct colour. The flues of the two stoves converge into one that emerges from the roof of the Sistine Chapel. White smoke means a pope has been elected and black smoke means the vote is inconclusive. If the cardinals take a first vote on Tuesday, it is expected to be inconclusive because there is no frontrunner, meaning black smoke will emerge.

    7:30 p.m. (2:30 p.m. EDT) - If no pope has been elected, the cardinals return to their residence.

    8:00 p.m. (3 p.m. EDT) - The cardinals dine together in the residence.
  • Interested in knowing more about the leading contenders? Here's a brief bio of Italy's Angelo Scola from Reuters:

    Angelo Scola, 71, is archbishop of Milan, often a springboard to the papacy, and the leading Italian candidate. An expert on moral theology, Pope Benedict moved him there from Venice - another papal launching pad - in 2011 in what some saw as a sign of approval. Scola was long close to the conservative Italian Catholic group Communion and Liberation, which Benedict also favoured, but he has kept his distance in recent years. He is familiar with Islam as head of a centre for Muslim-Christian understanding, with wide contacts abroad. His dense intellectual oratory could put off cardinals seeking a charismatic preacher.
  • Italian Cardinal Angelo Scola, right, and Cardinal Antonius Naguib, of Egypt, share a word as they attend a Mass for the election of a new pope inside St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican on March 12, 2013. AP Photo/Andrew Medichini

  • Here's more on Brazil's Odilo Scherer, also from Reuters:

    Odilo Scherer, 63, is the leading candidate from Latin America, where 42 percent of the world’s Catholics live. Archbishop of Sao Paulo, the biggest diocese in the country with more Catholics than any other, he is seen as conservative there but would rank as a moderate elsewhere. His German family roots and stint working in the Vatican administration, the Curia, give him important links to Europe, the largest voting bloc. Italian media say he enjoys support among Curia cardinals opposed to Scola. He is known for a sense of humour and tweets regularly. The rapid growth of Protestant churches in Brazil that are wooing away Catholics could count against him.
  • Cardinal Odilo Pedro Scherer, of Brazil, attends a Mass for the election of a new pope celebrated at St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican on March 12, 2013. AP Photo/Andrew Medichini

  • The cardinals are now emerging in a procession from the Pauline Chapel to the Sistine Chapel, where they will begin the conclave.
  • Click here to watch the procession, via a video feed from the Vatican.
  • The cardinals are entering the Sistine Chapel, where special tables and chairs have been set up for the voting process.
  • As they file into the Sistine Chapel, the 115 voting-age cardinals are chanting the Litany of the Saints.
  • The cardinals are doing their work in the Sistine Chapel, underneath Michelangelo's magnificent paintings with scenes of “Creation” and “The Last Judgment.”
  • The cardinals are now taking the oath of secrecy.
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